Friday, 24 December 2010

CAMPACC launches briefings on ‘terrorist’ bans


London: UK bans on organisations deter people from speaking out about injustices in their homelands by prohibiting expressions of solidarity with groups deemed to be “terrorists”. These bans make the UK government complicit with oppressive regimes overseas. New briefing papers explain what this means for four communities– Kurds, Tamils, Baluch and Basques. Produced by CAMPACC in close collaboration with the four communities, the papers put the case for challenging the bans, for lifting them and thus for decriminalising migrant communities here. 

On Monday 20 December the CAMPACC celebrated the launch of four new briefing papers that highlight the impact of UK government anti-terrorism legislation on migrant communities here. In particular, bans on organisations make the UK government complicit with oppressive regimes overseas; this neither enhances human rights nor protects our security.

The participants of the meeting also had the opportunity to hear contributions from representatives of four communities – KurdsTamilsBaluch and Basques (the subjects of the four papers). Speakers had explained how their communities are living in fear under the constraints imposed by the UK’s unjust laws. In particular, the ban on overseas organisations and support for liberation movements deters people from speaking out about injustices in their homelands by prohibiting expressions of solidarity with groups deemed to be “terrorists”. The speakers complained that when their respective communities are subjected to state terrorism the civilised world stands upon and watches in horror. They were of the view that states’ sponsored terrorism is much worse than the actions of non-state actors or the Organisations that are resisting state terror against the occupied communities.

Speakers and commentators also complained that the state forces, rogue regimes such as Iran, Pakistan, Israel, Turkey, Sri Lanka, Spain and several others continue their terror on Nations under their occupation with impunity and the western democracies do not ban or proscribe them.

The papers question the bans by showing how they unfairly criminalise communities and curtain freedoms that should be regarded as fundamental rights.

The meeting was chaired by Dr Vicki Sentas, School of Law King’s College and CAMPACC whereas the speakers include Jeremy Corbyn MP, Cumarasamy Chithambarapillai a Tamil lawyer, Kasim Agpak of Kurdish Federation UK, Nobat Marri, a Baloch activist who spoke on Hybyair Marri’s behalf and Kiko Moraiz of London Basques Solidarity Campaign. Videos of the meeting will be published soon. 

For more details visit: http://www.campacc.org.uk/

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